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Author Topic: How much in demand are males as breeders?
DVScottysM-
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Post How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: August 24, 2011, 11:03
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I hate to be asking this question, but my husband and Scotty are not getting along and Scotty was meant to be his bird. Now I favor the solution of making Scotty MY bird, but I wonder how many options there are.

Scotty definitely sees me as a mate-figure I am pretty sure. He's sweet to me, almost always and offers me slightly used nuts and pellets with great frequency. He coos to me. He has on occasion during the Spring attempted to have his way with me. I discourage gently the overtly sexual stuff, but I am pretty sure I'm the chosen one in that regard.

He's totally different with my husband. He won't allow his hand in the cage, and when he plays with him from the cage top, it's a fairly aggressive form of play that can turn into biting. He also seems to have a history of rough handling by males, and he doesn't trust my husband's hands to the same degree he does mine. While he has never bitten me seriously (On occasion he grabs my ear with his beak, but has never drawn blood) he has bitten my husband and drawn blood with some frequency. It was very frequent at first and then they seemed to have reached an agreement where Scotty would happily go to him and hang out. But something happened yesterday evening and he got a fairly severe bite to the middle of his finger and he says it was very deliberate/aggressive. He was apparently trying to remove some hair from Scotty's feathers.

His immediate reaction was "I'm done, we have to get rid of him, he's dangerous" to which my immediate reaction was "No way! We'll let him be my bird and get you a bird". I expect he'll probably settle down (the husband, not the bird) but I'm wondering if life as a breeder is an option for him (the bird, not the husband). He was bred by EB who posts here sometimes and I believe he was co-parented. He's actually a great pet for me, his vocalizations are a blast and while I haven't done trick training with him, I think he'd be highly trainable. So I don't think it would be perpetuating bad temperament. The store owner/breeder we got him from said her vet had really wanted him as a breeder but she thought he should be a pet, FWIW. Is this potentially an option if I can't get husband happy again? Not saying I'll do it, probably won't, but is there a demand?

Michael
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: October 3, 2011, 13:09
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I'm not sure about the breeder part but I do know that Truman came from a domestically bred pair. It's a shame things didn't work out the way you planned. I think it may be time to give up getting a parrot for your husband though. It seems like you are so much better with birds than he is that it just naturally biases them over to you. Then he gets upset/jealous. I'm still not convinced that your husband had the patience to try to win Scotty over using a positive reinforcement taming/training approach so I dunno that he would have any better success with another bird. Sometimes people with previous bird experience take it for granted and don't slow down to work with a newer bird.

Fernand
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: October 4, 2011, 03:51
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When you buy a bird, you never know what can happen. Some people are bird people and some are not. Some birds are also people birds and some will never be 😉 ... My senegal was raised by me but changed her mind at puberty and tooked my roomate as her mate. He really is her favorite. But I kept a wonderful relationship with her. How? By constant handlings and showing her good behaviors. Very hard with a poicephalus but possible.

Often, problems arise because of the owners themselves. Everyone want to be the favorite and is working for it. Especially with babies. And intelligent as they are, the birds clearly take advantage of it :) .

To answer your question about putting it in breeding situation, I think this is the worst that could happen to him. He was raised with humans and I am not sure if he would "understand" why he can't no longer live with them. As a cape breeder, I think they are very hard to put in pair ( maybe that's why they are so rare)... I often receive e mails from people telling me that their "perfect" pair started to fight (sometimes to death)in breeding season.

If your husband wants the bird to leave, you better find him another place with humans.

DVScottysM-
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: October 5, 2011, 11:12
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Actually every time I think we're going to have a crisis, things improve... they are getting along pretty well at the moment!

Guest
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: September 1, 2012, 01:26
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Yay Scotty!

luvmyrb2
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: April 26, 2013, 19:40
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How is Scotty these days? Does he get along better with your husband now? Mine acts the same way with my husband, but my hubby also does not really try to work with him at all.

DVScottysM-
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: May 4, 2013, 18:18
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They get along quite well these days. Scotty does sometimes play rough with him, but there doesn't seem to be any really hostility and there hasn't been bloodshed in quite some time.

He has, however, learned to say "Ouch".

luvmyrb2
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Post Re: How much in demand are males as breeders?
on: May 5, 2013, 12:20
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That's great to hear!

I'm trying to teach Louis what "gentle" means when he plays a bit too rough, but even when he pinches too hard, I still find it less painful than my smaller birds were , even with his big beak!

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